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Steria and APD Launch Next Generation Contact Management Solution, SmartContact, for the Police

19th November 2013 16:05 IST

From Steria and APD Launch Next Generation Contact Management Solution, SmartContact, for the PoliceNoida, Uttar Pradesh, India (Steria (Business Wire India)) 

Steria and APD have formed a unique product development partnership to deliver SmartContact, a fully integrated, end-to-end contact management solution, which will enable the police to provide a consistent response to public contact in and beyond the control room. Better communication and information will lead to improved service and enhance the public’sperception of the police.
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Meet APD at Control Room Communications, 9 – 11 December, Vienna
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What are the fundamentals in disaster preparedness and responding in a crisis and what are the emerging lessons learned?

 – London Ambulance Service share their Olympics experience

 

 

 

Jason Killens, Deputy Director of Operations, London Ambulance Service and speaker at this year’s Control Room Communications conference shares his experiences with us.

IIR: How did you maintain service and business continuity in emergency response?
JK:
In planning for the delivery of service not only to London but also to games venues and other Olympic and Paralympic events during the summer of 2012 the London Ambulance Service (LAS) developed, planned and managed two distinct service areas or business units. The first was our response to and planning for Olympic and Paralympic games related activity. Planning for these events saw us draw on NHS ambulance personnel from across England, the first time significant mutual aid has been deployed for a protracted period. LAS also developed significant infrastructure projects such as our Olympic Deployment Centre and increases to the ambulance fleet for the duration of the games. Delivery across the two games periods was led by the Olympic Command team having been in the planning with multiagency partners for some 5 years. One element of the planning for the games was to increase our capacity to respond to multi-casualty incidents where special arrangements were put in place to enhance existing capabilities from early July through to mid-September.

The second service area was that which focused on maintaining routine services across London during the games. This was specifically important as whilst games venues hosted most of the sporting activity the impact of traveling spectators and those attending other cultural events that continued to be held such as the Notting Hill Carnival (the largest street carnival in Europe) was felt across London. It was important for us and for our commitments to the UK bid to host the games that normal service levels were maintained across the games.

Jason Killens will be presenting Ambulance Command, Control and Response in an Olympic City – Sharing the Experiences and Lessons Learned by London Ambulance Service During the 2012 Olympic Games at Control Room Communications on Wednesday 12th December 09:50 – 10:10.

Click here to read the full interview

Creating 10 Real – Time Intelligence Centres – Experiences from the Netherlands Police Force

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“Implementing RTIC’s in all Command and Control Rooms is a big challenge especially during a period of time in which the Dutch police is transforming from ‘old to new’ “Martien Hoogebeen, Project Manager – Control Rooms and Real Time Intelligence Centres Netherlands Police

Martien Hoogebeen will be presenting Creating 10 Real-Time Intelligence Centres – Experiences from the Netherlands Police Force at Control Room Communications 2012. He recently shared some of his experiences with us and gave insight into the challenges he faces, in building 10 RTIC’s – giving you a taste of what to expect at this years conference.

IIR: How do you examine the role and importance of having a real-time intelligence centre (RTIC) to support your control room and field units with information?

MH: The Dutch police are in the process of reforming. 26 independent police forces will transform into 1 national police force with 10 departments. At this moment there are 23 Command and Control Rooms in the Netherlands. As you might know, these Command and Control Rooms are, as we call it co-located: Fire Department, Ambulance and police are united in Command and Control Rooms. Those 23 Command and Control Rooms will, in time, also transform into 1 Command and Control Room organization with 10 facilities. That means an enormous operation for all services involved. To support this operation a new ICT environment is needed.  All Command and Control Room services are in the process of making preparations to buy and implement a brand new Command and Control Room tool. This process is being done with all services together.

For the police the time has come to improve our Command and Control Room performance and make a step toward a Command and Control Room that is not only a dispatch-centre but to one with a big role in directing operations in the field. The need to push real-time intelligence to units in the field is greatly felt. Units in the field are better prepared in combining information from different sources and reaction is quicker and more adequate and we can already see a larger number of arrests. The Dutch police are especially keen on improving the number of ‘red-handed arrests’. We see an important role for RTIC in monitoring social media. In the short history of RTIC we have seen a number of serious incidents (kidnapping, domestic violence, robberies) which were solved in a short amount of time, mainly by the use of intell from social media.

IIR: What are the challenges of building 10 RTIC’s and how can you share the lessons learned?

MH: Implementing RTIC’s in all Command and Control Rooms is a big challenge especially during a period of time in which the Dutch police is transforming from ‘old to new’. That has a lot to do with the transition of power. The 26 chiefs of police of old are still there but not really in charge anymore. The new chief (the only one) has already started his job but is not in charge formally. Regulations concerning personnel is changing but will only be in effect as of next year. So getting new personnel appointed, educated and transferred to their new jobs appeared to be quite difficult. Professional associations (trade unions) were not happy to comply and it took a lot of negotiating to make it happen.

Click here to read the full interview

Martien Hoogebeen Project Manager – Control Rooms and Real Time Intelligence Centres Netherlands Police will be speaking at Control Room Communications at 16:30 Tuesday on 11th December 2012.

For full details of all the learning and networking opportunities available to you at Control Room Communications, download the programme

How Should Emergency Service Control Rooms Prepare for HeERO 1 – eCall Pre-deployment?

Following on from the latest news regarding The European Parliament adopting a resolution that calls on the European Commission and the member states to make sure that the eCall system will be installed in every new vehicle by 2015…

Sébastien Mure, Project Support Manager, ERTICO-ITS Europe will be discussing e-Call and HeERO and the impact that their introduction will and is having on Control Room strategy and operational planning at Control Room Communications 2012. We recently gained his thoughts on this subject.

IIR: Introducing eCall – what does it do and what does this mean for the Control Room?
SM: The eCall is an emergency 112 call generated by a vehicle. It can be triggered either automatically when in-vehicle sensors have detected a serious crash, or manually by the vehicle occupants. When activated, it provides the emergency services control room operator with critical information such as the location of the vehicle, the direction of travelling before the crash and the type of vehicle within a few seconds. Immediately after the transmission of this data it also establishes a voice call between the vehicle and the operator. With eCall, the control room not only rapidly establishes a voice call with the vehicles occupants, but also receives additional information which saves precious time for the emergency services.

IIR: How do you share the results of the first 9 pilots with PSAPs across Europe?
SM: HeERO has engaged in a broad and varied dissemination strategy to raise awareness of the project amongst emergency services experts, and increasingly amongst citizens too. It has also provided input to the international expert group on PSAP upgrades for eCall, a group organised by the European Commission. Finally, at a national level, HeERO partners are committed to sharing their experience with other PSAPs. This can be complex in countries where emergency services are a regional level competency.

Sébastien Mure will present Examining how Emergency Service Control Rooms Should Prepare for HeERO 1 – eCall Pre-deployment on Tuesday 11 December at 15.45 at Control Room Communications 2012.

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE

eCall system to be installed in every new vehicle by 2015

“The European Parliament adopted a resolution that calls on the European Commission and the member states to make sure that the eCall system will be installed in every new vehicle by 2015. In case of a crash anywhere in the EU, vehicles equipped with the eCall system will automatically dial the European emergency number 1-1-2 Radio Resources Media Group, November 2012 – Click here to read more

Sébastien Mure will present Examining how Emergency Service Control Rooms Should Prepare for HeERO 1 – eCall Pre-deployment on Tuesday 11 December at 15.45 at IIR Telecoms Control Room Communications 2012

 

Reach 112, HeERO and eCall and the impact that their introduction will and is having on Control Room strategy and operational planning

This year’s Control Room Communications conference programme will carefully evaluate Reach 112, HeERO and eCall and the impact that their introduction will and is having on Control Room strategy and operational planning.

You will hear detailed case studies, analysis of pilot projects and practical examples of how to effectively manage increasing data inputs. The programme will debate the required changes in IT systems and working processes in order to handle digital information.  During the dedicated session you will learn from: (more…)

Do you need updates on how to effectively harness Social Media in your Control Room Communications Strategy?

This year’s Control Room Communications conference programme will delve deep into positively incorporating social media, to better inform the Control Room Environment.

You will hear detailed case studies, analysis and practical examples of how social media and other Internet media can be used effectively for everyday operations, as well as for Crisis Communications.

Benefit From A Focused Session:  Tuesday 11th December – Social Media Management Strategies

Leveraging Social Media to Add Citizen Insights into the Control Room Environment
– Carlijn Broekman, Scientific Researcher, TNO

Using Social and Other Internet Media in Crisis Communications
– Dr. Joachim Klerx, Scientist, AIT

Examining the Use of Social Media in Daily Police Work – The Experiences of the Rotterdam Police Force
 – Dianne van Gammeren, Head of Control Room, Rotterdam Police Force
– Henk van der Linden, Project Manager – Social Media, Rotterdam Police Force

Using Social Media in Crisis Communication – Examining the Collaborative Efforts of Public and Private Sector Communication Experts
 – Marc van Daele, Communication Manager, City of Zwijndrecht, Belgium & Vice-President of Kortom, Professional Association for Public Communication

To find out more and to register your place as a delegate visit: http://controlroomcommunications.com

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